Discussion:
Dimensional Analysis question
(too old to reply)
Shayne Fletcher
2014-10-16 16:37:19 UTC
Permalink
Dear OCamlers,

In 1994, Barton and Nackman in their book 'Scientific Engineering in
C++' [1] demonstrated how one could encode the rules of Dimensional
Analysis [2] into the C++ type system enabling compile-time checking
(no runtime-cost) of the plausibility (at least up to the dimensional
correctness) of computations.

In 2004, Abrahams & Gurtovy in 'C++ Template Metaprogramming' [3]
showed the Barton Nackman technique to be elegantly implementable
using compile time type sequences encoding integer constants. At the
end of this post, I provide a complete listing of their example
program [4].

The key properties of the system (as I see it) are:
- Encoding of integers as types;
- Compile time manipulation of sequences of these integer encodings
to deduce/produce new derived types.

Now, it is not immediately obvious to me how to approach this problem
in OCaml. It irks me some that I can't immediately produce a yet more
elegant OCaml program for this problem and leaves me feeling like C++
has "got something over on us" here ;)

My question therefore is: Does anyone have suggestions/pointers
on how to approach automatic dimensional analysis via the OCaml type
system?

Best,
--
Shayne Fletcher

[1] John J. Barton and Lee R. Nackman. Scientific and Engineering C++:
an Introduction with Advanced Techniques and Examples. Reading,
MA: Addison Wesley. ISBN 0-201-53393-6. 1994.

[2] Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimensional_analysis

[3] David Abrahams and Aleksey Gurtovy C++ Template Metaprogramming:
Concepts, Tools, and Techniques from Boost and Beyond (C++ in
Depth Series), Addison-Wesley Professional. ISBN:0321227255. 2004.

[4] Code listing:

//"c:/program files (x86)/Microsoft Visual Studio
10.0/vc/vcvarsall.bat" x64
//cl /Fedimension.exe /EHsc /I d:/boost_1_55_0 dimension.cpp

#include <boost/mpl/vector_c.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/transform.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/placeholders.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/equal.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/plus.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/minus.hpp>
#include <boost/static_assert.hpp>

typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,1,0,0,0,0,0,0> mass;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,1,0,0,0,0,0> length;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,1,0,0,0,0> time;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,1,0,0,0> charge;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,1,0,0> temperature;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,0,1,0> intensity;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,0,0,1> angle;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,1,-1,0,0,0,0> velocity; // l/t
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,1,-2,0,0,0,0> acceleration; // l/(t2)
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,1,1,-1,0,0,0,0> momentum; // ml/t
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,1,1,-2,0,0,0,0> force; //
ml/(t2)
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,0,0,0> scalar;

template <class T, class Dimensions>
class quantity
{
public:
explicit quantity (T val)
: val (val)
{}
template <class OtherDimensions>
quantity (quantity<T, OtherDimensions> const& other)
: val (other.value ()) {
BOOST_MPL_ASSERT( (boost::mpl::equal<Dimensions, OtherDimensions>));
}
T value () const { return val; }
private:
T val;
};

template <class T, class D>
quantity<T, D>
operator + (quantity<T, D> x, quantity<T, D> y )
{
return quantity<T, D>(x.value () + y.value ());
}

template <class T, class D>
quantity<T, D>
operator - (quantity<T, D> x, quantity<T, D> y )
{
return quantity<T, D>(x.value () - y.value ());
}

template <class T, class D1, class D2>
quantity <
T
, typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::plus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type
operator* (quantity<T, D1> x, quantity <T, D2> y)
{
typedef typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::plus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type D;

return quantity<T, D> (x.value () * y.value ());
}

template <class T, class D1, class D2>
quantity <
T
, typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::minus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type
operator/ (quantity<T, D1> x, quantity <T, D2> y)
{
typedef typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::minus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type D;

return quantity<T, D> (x.value () / y.value ());
}

// -- test

#include <iostream>
#include <limits>
#include <cassert>

int main ()
{
quantity<float, mass> m (5.0f);
quantity<float, acceleration> a(9.8f);
quantity<float, force> f = m * a;
quantity<float, mass> m2 = f / a;

assert ((std::abs ((m2 - m).value ())) <=
std::numeric_limits<double>::epsilon ());

return 0;
}
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Octachron
2014-10-16 17:21:53 UTC
Permalink
Hello,
As far as I know it is possible to do some kind of basic dimensional
analysis.

The idea is to encode natural number at the type level as
0 :: 'a -> 'a
1:: 'a -> 'a succ
n :: 'a -> 'a succ .... succ (with n succ)

In other words, we are encoding translation on natural numbers rather
than the natural numbers themselves.
The free parameter 'a allows to type addition and substraction. We can
then define numbers with unit as a phantom type

type 'a t = float

and for instance a meter function as

let m : float -> < m : 'a -> 'a > t = fun x -> x

where the row type is merely used to have nice label for the type name.

Addition and substraction then preserve the phantom type
val + : 'a t -> 'a t -> 'a t

whereas multiplication and division use the free type parameter in the
natural encoding to perform the addition

let ( * ) : <m : 'inf -> 'mid > t -> <m: 'mid -> 'sup> t -> <m: 'inf ->
'sup> t = *.
let (/): < m: inf->sup > t -> <m:inf->mid> t -> <m: mid-> sup> t = ( /. )

This solution works for basic use but falls apart in complex use due to
the lack of second-rank polymorphism.
For instance,

let y = m 2. * m 3.

works but

let x = m 2. in
let y = x * x

doe not. Even worse

let () =
let x = m 1. in
let y = m 2. in
let w = x * y in
()

works but

let () =
let x = m 1. in
let y = m 2. in
let w = x * y in
let z = x + y in
()

triggers a compilation error.
And unfortunately, I am not aware of any way to avoid these quirky
behaviors.

Regards,
octachron.
Post by Shayne Fletcher
Dear OCamlers,
In 1994, Barton and Nackman in their book 'Scientific Engineering in
C++' [1] demonstrated how one could encode the rules of Dimensional
Analysis [2] into the C++ type system enabling compile-time checking
(no runtime-cost) of the plausibility (at least up to the dimensional
correctness) of computations.
In 2004, Abrahams & Gurtovy in 'C++ Template Metaprogramming' [3]
showed the Barton Nackman technique to be elegantly implementable
using compile time type sequences encoding integer constants. At the
end of this post, I provide a complete listing of their example
program [4].
- Encoding of integers as types;
- Compile time manipulation of sequences of these integer encodings
to deduce/produce new derived types.
Now, it is not immediately obvious to me how to approach this problem
in OCaml. It irks me some that I can't immediately produce a yet more
elegant OCaml program for this problem and leaves me feeling like C++
has "got something over on us" here ;)
My question therefore is: Does anyone have suggestions/pointers
on how to approach automatic dimensional analysis via the OCaml type
system?
Best,
--
Shayne Fletcher
an Introduction with Advanced Techniques and Examples. Reading,
MA: Addison Wesley. ISBN 0-201-53393-6. 1994.
[2] Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimensional_analysis
Concepts, Tools, and Techniques from Boost and Beyond (C++ in
Depth Series), Addison-Wesley Professional. ISBN:0321227255. 2004.
//"c:/program files (x86)/Microsoft Visual Studio
10.0/vc/vcvarsall.bat" x64
//cl /Fedimension.exe /EHsc /I d:/boost_1_55_0 dimension.cpp
#include <boost/mpl/vector_c.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/transform.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/placeholders.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/equal.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/plus.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/minus.hpp>
#include <boost/static_assert.hpp>
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,1,0,0,0,0,0,0> mass;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,1,0,0,0,0,0> length;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,1,0,0,0,0> time;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,1,0,0,0> charge;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,1,0,0> temperature;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,0,1,0> intensity;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,0,0,1> angle;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,1,-1,0,0,0,0> velocity; // l/t
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,1,-2,0,0,0,0> acceleration; // l/(t2)
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,1,1,-1,0,0,0,0> momentum; // ml/t
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,1,1,-2,0,0,0,0> force; // ml/(t2)
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,0,0,0> scalar;
template <class T, class Dimensions>
class quantity
{
explicit quantity (T val)
: val (val)
{}
template <class OtherDimensions>
quantity (quantity<T, OtherDimensions> const& other)
: val (other.value ()) {
BOOST_MPL_ASSERT( (boost::mpl::equal<Dimensions,
OtherDimensions>));
}
T value () const { return val; }
T val;
};
template <class T, class D>
quantity<T, D>
operator + (quantity<T, D> x, quantity<T, D> y )
{
return quantity<T, D>(x.value () + y.value ());
}
template <class T, class D>
quantity<T, D>
operator - (quantity<T, D> x, quantity<T, D> y )
{
return quantity<T, D>(x.value () - y.value ());
}
template <class T, class D1, class D2>
quantity <
T
, typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::plus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type
operator* (quantity<T, D1> x, quantity <T, D2> y)
{
typedef typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::plus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type D;
return quantity<T, D> (x.value () * y.value ());
}
template <class T, class D1, class D2>
quantity <
T
, typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::minus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type
operator/ (quantity<T, D1> x, quantity <T, D2> y)
{
typedef typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::minus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type D;
return quantity<T, D> (x.value () / y.value ());
}
// -- test
#include <iostream>
#include <limits>
#include <cassert>
int main ()
{
quantity<float, mass> m (5.0f);
quantity<float, acceleration> a(9.8f);
quantity<float, force> f = m * a;
quantity<float, mass> m2 = f / a;
assert ((std::abs ((m2 - m).value ())) <=
std::numeric_limits<double>::epsilon ());
return 0;
}
--
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Beginner's list: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ocaml_beginners
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Mario Alvarez Picallo
2014-10-16 17:35:32 UTC
Permalink
Hello Shayne,

I was at first convinced that this could not be done, but you can in fact
encode it (in a verbose way) with phantom types,
using a smart typelevel representation of integers (
http://www.kb.ecei.tohoku.ac.jp/ml2008/slides/lindley.pdf).

I've written a small proof of concept that seems to work just fine (but, of
course, there may be errors), that you can find
here: https://gist.github.com/m-alvarez/b1e42b7b42cbeed7d1f0

It seems to be solid enough to pass the tests that Octachron tried, but
there probably are some other corner cases for which
it breaks down. Otherwise, it would be interesting to coalesce both
representations, using Octachron's idea of row types instead
of tuples to have extensible dimensional analysis, where each part of the
program can introduce its own dimensions.

Regards,
Mario A.

On Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 6:37 PM, Shayne Fletcher <
Post by Shayne Fletcher
Dear OCamlers,
In 1994, Barton and Nackman in their book 'Scientific Engineering in
C++' [1] demonstrated how one could encode the rules of Dimensional
Analysis [2] into the C++ type system enabling compile-time checking
(no runtime-cost) of the plausibility (at least up to the dimensional
correctness) of computations.
In 2004, Abrahams & Gurtovy in 'C++ Template Metaprogramming' [3]
showed the Barton Nackman technique to be elegantly implementable
using compile time type sequences encoding integer constants. At the
end of this post, I provide a complete listing of their example
program [4].
- Encoding of integers as types;
- Compile time manipulation of sequences of these integer encodings
to deduce/produce new derived types.
Now, it is not immediately obvious to me how to approach this problem
in OCaml. It irks me some that I can't immediately produce a yet more
elegant OCaml program for this problem and leaves me feeling like C++
has "got something over on us" here ;)
My question therefore is: Does anyone have suggestions/pointers
on how to approach automatic dimensional analysis via the OCaml type
system?
Best,
--
Shayne Fletcher
an Introduction with Advanced Techniques and Examples. Reading,
MA: Addison Wesley. ISBN 0-201-53393-6. 1994.
[2] Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimensional_analysis
Concepts, Tools, and Techniques from Boost and Beyond (C++ in
Depth Series), Addison-Wesley Professional. ISBN:0321227255. 2004.
//"c:/program files (x86)/Microsoft Visual Studio
10.0/vc/vcvarsall.bat" x64
//cl /Fedimension.exe /EHsc /I d:/boost_1_55_0 dimension.cpp
#include <boost/mpl/vector_c.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/transform.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/placeholders.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/equal.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/plus.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/minus.hpp>
#include <boost/static_assert.hpp>
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,1,0,0,0,0,0,0> mass;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,1,0,0,0,0,0> length;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,1,0,0,0,0> time;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,1,0,0,0> charge;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,1,0,0> temperature;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,0,1,0> intensity;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,0,0,1> angle;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,1,-1,0,0,0,0> velocity; // l/t
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,1,-2,0,0,0,0> acceleration; // l/(t2)
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,1,1,-1,0,0,0,0> momentum; // ml/t
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,1,1,-2,0,0,0,0> force; //
ml/(t2)
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,0,0,0> scalar;
template <class T, class Dimensions>
class quantity
{
explicit quantity (T val)
: val (val)
{}
template <class OtherDimensions>
quantity (quantity<T, OtherDimensions> const& other)
: val (other.value ()) {
BOOST_MPL_ASSERT( (boost::mpl::equal<Dimensions,
OtherDimensions>));
}
T value () const { return val; }
T val;
};
template <class T, class D>
quantity<T, D>
operator + (quantity<T, D> x, quantity<T, D> y )
{
return quantity<T, D>(x.value () + y.value ());
}
template <class T, class D>
quantity<T, D>
operator - (quantity<T, D> x, quantity<T, D> y )
{
return quantity<T, D>(x.value () - y.value ());
}
template <class T, class D1, class D2>
quantity <
T
, typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::plus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type
operator* (quantity<T, D1> x, quantity <T, D2> y)
{
typedef typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::plus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type D;
return quantity<T, D> (x.value () * y.value ());
}
template <class T, class D1, class D2>
quantity <
T
, typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::minus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type
operator/ (quantity<T, D1> x, quantity <T, D2> y)
{
typedef typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::minus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type D;
return quantity<T, D> (x.value () / y.value ());
}
// -- test
#include <iostream>
#include <limits>
#include <cassert>
int main ()
{
quantity<float, mass> m (5.0f);
quantity<float, acceleration> a(9.8f);
quantity<float, force> f = m * a;
quantity<float, mass> m2 = f / a;
assert ((std::abs ((m2 - m).value ())) <=
std::numeric_limits<double>::epsilon ());
return 0;
}
--
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Beginner's list: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ocaml_beginners
Bug reports: http://caml.inria.fr/bin/caml-bugs
Octachron
2014-10-17 05:58:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mario Alvarez Picallo
Hello Shayne,
I was at first convinced that this could not be done, but you can in
fact encode it (in a verbose way) with phantom types,
using a smart typelevel representation of integers
(http://www.kb.ecei.tohoku.ac.jp/ml2008/slides/lindley.pdf).
I've written a small proof of concept that seems to work just fine
(but, of course, there may be errors), that you can find
here: https://gist.github.com/m-alvarez/b1e42b7b42cbeed7d1f0
It seems to be solid enough to pass the tests that Octachron tried,
but there probably are some other corner cases for which
it breaks down. Otherwise, it would be interesting to coalesce both
representations, using Octachron's idea of row types instead
of tuples to have extensible dimensional analysis, where each part of
the program can introduce its own dimensions.
Regards,
Mario A.
I forget to add variance annotation in my test so my examples broke down
due to the presence of monomorphic types. With the right implementation
(i.e. Mario's),
problems appear within functions. For instance,

let f x = x* x

works only for adimensional variable (i.e f : ('a*'a) t -> ('a*'a) t )
which is maybe not surprising.
However, the same thing also happens to

let f x y = (x+y)*x*y .

because the type of x and y are unified during the addition "x+y".

Regards,
Octachron.
--
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Beginner's list: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ocaml_beginners
Bug reports: http://caml.inria.fr/bin/caml-bugs
Thomas Gazagnaire
2014-10-16 18:10:56 UTC
Permalink
You might be interested by http://akabe.github.io/slap/

Thomas
Post by Shayne Fletcher
Dear OCamlers,
In 1994, Barton and Nackman in their book 'Scientific Engineering in
C++' [1] demonstrated how one could encode the rules of Dimensional
Analysis [2] into the C++ type system enabling compile-time checking
(no runtime-cost) of the plausibility (at least up to the dimensional
correctness) of computations.
In 2004, Abrahams & Gurtovy in 'C++ Template Metaprogramming' [3]
showed the Barton Nackman technique to be elegantly implementable
using compile time type sequences encoding integer constants. At the
end of this post, I provide a complete listing of their example
program [4].
- Encoding of integers as types;
- Compile time manipulation of sequences of these integer encodings
to deduce/produce new derived types.
Now, it is not immediately obvious to me how to approach this problem
in OCaml. It irks me some that I can't immediately produce a yet more
elegant OCaml program for this problem and leaves me feeling like C++
has "got something over on us" here ;)
My question therefore is: Does anyone have suggestions/pointers
on how to approach automatic dimensional analysis via the OCaml type
system?
Best,
--
Shayne Fletcher
an Introduction with Advanced Techniques and Examples. Reading,
MA: Addison Wesley. ISBN 0-201-53393-6. 1994.
[2] Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimensional_analysis
Concepts, Tools, and Techniques from Boost and Beyond (C++ in
Depth Series), Addison-Wesley Professional. ISBN:0321227255. 2004.
//"c:/program files (x86)/Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0/vc/vcvarsall.bat" x64
//cl /Fedimension.exe /EHsc /I d:/boost_1_55_0 dimension.cpp
#include <boost/mpl/vector_c.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/transform.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/placeholders.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/equal.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/plus.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/minus.hpp>
#include <boost/static_assert.hpp>
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,1,0,0,0,0,0,0> mass;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,1,0,0,0,0,0> length;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,1,0,0,0,0> time;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,1,0,0,0> charge;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,1,0,0> temperature;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,0,1,0> intensity;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,0,0,1> angle;
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,1,-1,0,0,0,0> velocity; // l/t
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,1,-2,0,0,0,0> acceleration; // l/(t2)
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,1,1,-1,0,0,0,0> momentum; // ml/t
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,1,1,-2,0,0,0,0> force; // ml/(t2)
typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,0,0,0> scalar;
template <class T, class Dimensions>
class quantity
{
explicit quantity (T val)
: val (val)
{}
template <class OtherDimensions>
quantity (quantity<T, OtherDimensions> const& other)
: val (other.value ()) {
BOOST_MPL_ASSERT( (boost::mpl::equal<Dimensions, OtherDimensions>));
}
T value () const { return val; }
T val;
};
template <class T, class D>
quantity<T, D>
operator + (quantity<T, D> x, quantity<T, D> y )
{
return quantity<T, D>(x.value () + y.value ());
}
template <class T, class D>
quantity<T, D>
operator - (quantity<T, D> x, quantity<T, D> y )
{
return quantity<T, D>(x.value () - y.value ());
}
template <class T, class D1, class D2>
quantity <
T
, typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::plus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type
operator* (quantity<T, D1> x, quantity <T, D2> y)
{
typedef typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::plus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type D;
return quantity<T, D> (x.value () * y.value ());
}
template <class T, class D1, class D2>
quantity <
T
, typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::minus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type
operator/ (quantity<T, D1> x, quantity <T, D2> y)
{
typedef typename boost::mpl::transform<
D1, D2, boost::mpl::minus<
boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
, boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type D;
return quantity<T, D> (x.value () / y.value ());
}
// -- test
#include <iostream>
#include <limits>
#include <cassert>
int main ()
{
quantity<float, mass> m (5.0f);
quantity<float, acceleration> a(9.8f);
quantity<float, force> f = m * a;
quantity<float, mass> m2 = f / a;
assert ((std::abs ((m2 - m).value ())) <= std::numeric_limits<double>::epsilon ());
return 0;
}
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David MENTRE
2014-10-17 10:22:26 UTC
Permalink
Hello Thomas,
Post by Thomas Gazagnaire
You might be interested by http://akabe.github.io/slap/
As far as I understand it, slap checks dimensions with the meaning
*size* (of matrices, vectors). But slap does not help for checking
*physical* dimensions (meters, seconds, m*s^-2, ...).

Best regards,
david
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Shayne Fletcher
2014-10-16 19:36:29 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 12:37 PM, Shayne Fletcher <
Post by Shayne Fletcher
My question therefore is: Does anyone have suggestions/pointers
on how to approach automatic dimensional analysis via the OCaml type
system?
​Thanks Octachron, Mario, Thomas... Great help. I've got some study to do!
--
Shayne Fletcher
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Roberto Di Cosmo
2014-10-17 06:50:21 UTC
Permalink
Dear Shayne,
you might have a look at the thread answering a similar question
I asked last june on the list, here:

https://sympa.inria.fr/sympa/arc/caml-list/2014-06/msg00066.html

Notice that the very first viable experiment of a variant of CamlLight
with full dimension types (non encodings) was announced by Bruno Blanchet back in 1995
http://caml.inria.fr/pub/ml-archives/caml-list/1995/12/2c6fa7b3b2b429cf39f10b60d2230850.fr.html

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Roberto
Post by Shayne Fletcher
Dear OCamlers,
In 1994, Barton and Nackman in their book 'Scientific Engineering in
C++' [1] demonstrated how one could encode the rules of Dimensional
Analysis [2] into the C++ type system enabling compile-time checking
(no runtime-cost) of the plausibility (at least up to the dimensional
correctness) of computations.
In 2004, Abrahams & Gurtovy in 'C++ Template Metaprogramming' [3]
showed the Barton Nackman technique to be elegantly implementable
using compile time type sequences encoding integer constants. At the
end of this post, I provide a complete listing of their example
program [4].
  - Encoding of integers as types; 
  - Compile time manipulation of sequences of these integer encodings
    to deduce/produce new derived types.
Now, it is not immediately obvious to me how to approach this problem
in OCaml. It irks me some that I can't immediately produce a yet more
elegant OCaml program for this problem and leaves me feeling like C++
has "got something over on us" here ;)
My question therefore is: Does anyone have suggestions/pointers
on how to approach automatic dimensional analysis via the OCaml type
system? 
Best,
-- 
Shayne Fletcher
    an Introduction with Advanced Techniques and Examples. Reading,
    MA: Addison Wesley. ISBN 0-201-53393-6. 1994.
[2] Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimensional_analysis
    Concepts, Tools, and Techniques from Boost and Beyond (C++ in
    Depth Series), Addison-Wesley Professional. ISBN:0321227255. 2004.
    //"c:/program files (x86)/Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0/vc/vcvarsall.bat"
x64
    //cl /Fedimension.exe /EHsc /I d:/boost_1_55_0 dimension.cpp
    
    #include <boost/mpl/vector_c.hpp>
    #include <boost/mpl/transform.hpp>
    #include <boost/mpl/placeholders.hpp>
    #include <boost/mpl/equal.hpp>
    #include <boost/mpl/plus.hpp>
    #include <boost/mpl/minus.hpp>
    #include <boost/static_assert.hpp>
    
    typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,1,0,0,0,0,0,0> mass;
    typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,1,0,0,0,0,0> length;
    typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,1,0,0,0,0> time;
    typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,1,0,0,0> charge;
    typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,1,0,0> temperature;
    typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,0,1,0> intensity;
    typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,0,0,1> angle;
    typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,1,-1,0,0,0,0> velocity;     // l/t
    typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,1,-2,0,0,0,0> acceleration; // l/(t2)
    typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,1,1,-1,0,0,0,0> momentum;     // ml/t
    typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,1,1,-2,0,0,0,0> force;        // ml/(t2)
    typedef boost::mpl::vector_c<int,0,0,0,0,0,0,0> scalar;
    
    template <class T, class Dimensions>
    class quantity
    {
      explicit quantity (T val) 
        : val (val)
      {}
      template <class OtherDimensions>
      quantity (quantity<T, OtherDimensions> const& other)
        : val (other.value ()) {
        BOOST_MPL_ASSERT( (boost::mpl::equal<Dimensions, OtherDimensions>));
      }
      T value () const { return val; }
      T val;
    };
    
    template <class T, class D>
    quantity<T, D>
    operator + (quantity<T, D> x, quantity<T, D> y )
    {
      return quantity<T, D>(x.value () + y.value ());
    }
    
    template <class T, class D>
    quantity<T, D>
    operator - (quantity<T, D> x, quantity<T, D> y )
    {
      return quantity<T, D>(x.value () - y.value ());
    }
    
    template <class T, class D1, class D2>
    quantity <
      T
    , typename boost::mpl::transform<
        D1, D2, boost::mpl::plus<
                  boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
                , boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type 
    >
    operator* (quantity<T, D1> x, quantity <T, D2> y)
    {
      typedef typename boost::mpl::transform<
        D1, D2, boost::mpl::plus<
                  boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
                  , boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type D;
    
      return quantity<T, D> (x.value () * y.value ());
    }
    
    template <class T, class D1, class D2>
    quantity <
      T
    , typename boost::mpl::transform<
        D1, D2, boost::mpl::minus<
                  boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
                , boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type 
    >
    operator/ (quantity<T, D1> x, quantity <T, D2> y)
    {
      typedef typename boost::mpl::transform<
        D1, D2, boost::mpl::minus<
                  boost::mpl::placeholders::_1
                  , boost::mpl::placeholders::_2> >::type D;
    
      return quantity<T, D> (x.value () / y.value ());
    }
    
    // -- test
    
    #include <iostream>
    #include <limits>
    #include <cassert>
    
    int main ()
    {
      quantity<float, mass> m (5.0f);
      quantity<float, acceleration> a(9.8f);
      quantity<float, force> f = m * a;
      quantity<float, mass> m2 = f / a;
    
      assert ((std::abs ((m2 - m).value ())) <= std::numeric_limits
<double>::epsilon ());
    
      return 0;
    }
--
Roberto Di Cosmo

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Search results for 'Dimensional Analysis question' (Questions and Answers)
11
replies
O que justifica a análise dimensional?
started 2014-02-08 00:32:45 UTC
física
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